RESEARCH CENTRE FOR BRAIN INJURY REHABILITATION

HOME ABOUT ReCBIR GOALS NETWORK RESEARCH LINES/PROJECTS EDUCATION PUBLICATIONS LINKS CONTACT  

ReCBIR RELATED UNIT PROFILES

 

 

   

Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit

POTENTIAL RESEARCH COLLABORATION within ReCBIR
POTENTIAL EDUCATIONAL COLLABORATION within ReCBIR
< CONTACT INFORMATION          
  Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit   15 Chaucer Rd

Cambridge CB2 2EF

  phone: +44 1223 355294

fax: +44 1223 359062

 
        England, U.K      
               
 

The rehabilitation research group

Box 58, Addenbrooke's Hospital      
       

Hills Rd.

     
        Cambridge CB2 2QQ      
        England, U.K      
                   
  HEAD OF REHABILITATION RESEARCH   Prof. Barbara Wilson   email: barbara.wilson@mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk  
          Phone: +44 1223 355294 ext 351 (secretary) or ext. 355 (direct)  
          Fax: +44 1223 516630  
  THE UNIT DIRECTOR   Prof. William Marslen-Wilson      
                 
  UNIT DESCRIPTION:      
Background:  

The World Health Organisation defines rehabilitation as "the restoration of patients to the highest level of physical, psychological and social adaptation attainable. It includes all measures aimed at reducing the impact of disabling and handicapping conditions and at enabling disabled people to achieve optimal social integration." Wilson further defines cognitive rehabilitation as 'a process whereby people with brain injury work together with professional staff and others to remediate or alleviate cognitive deficits arising from a neurological insult.

 
 
                 
  BRAIN INJURY RELATED RESEARCH:   The neuropsychological rehabilitation of memory and learning disorders  
         

The research group is led by a MRC senior scientist, Barbara Wilson, and is linked with the Oliver Zangwill Centre for Neuropsychological Rehabilitation in Ely, which was opened in September 1996 as a result of collaboration between Lifespan NHS Trust, Anglia and Oxford Research and Development Initiative, and the MRC.

 
 
 
           
      Research Programmes:    
        The current studies in neuropsychological rehabilitation are focused on the following main areas:  
          1. Development of new assessment procedures to develop ecologically valid tests to identify and monitor cognitive deficits and predict behaviour outside the laboratory or clinic. Current projects include in particular development of tests of prospective memory, post traumatic amnesia, divided attention and dysexecutive deficits in children  
          2. Theoretically derived treatment techniques for cognitive disabilities following brain injury, such as errorless learning paradigms and computerised reminding services, such as NeuroPage and Memojog (in collaboration with the Oliver Zangwill Centre)  
          3. Improving predicting of recovery from brain injury (e.g., during and after coma) and testing the efficacy of different rehabilitation interventions, such as the effects of posture on arousal (in collaboration with Department of Academic Neurosurgery, the Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, and the Neurosurgical Critical Care Unit at Addenbrooke's Hospital)  
      Approaches:    
        Neuropsychology:  
          The groups studied include:                                                         

(i) people with cognitive problems resulting from non-progressive brain injury, such as traumatic head injury, encephalitis, hypoxic brain damage and stroke;

(ii) people with Huntington's Disease, Multiple Sclerosis and other progressive conditions.

 
        Brain Imaging:  
         

PET is used to demonstrate distinct and specific physiological responses (changes in cerebral blood flow, rCBF) to controlled external stimuli in patients in the vegetative and minimally conscious states and to examine changes in and interelationships between behavioural, electrophysiological and rCBF in patients as they emerge from coma.

 
        Behavioural assessment:  
         

Objective assessment of residual cognitive function in patients in the VS and MCS depends on motor and other responses which may be minimal, inconsistent, difficult to document, or undetectable. Observation and analysis of behaviour in these and similar groups can be used to detect evidence of function.

 
BACK TO TOP          
                   
  POTENTIAL RESEARCH COLLABORATION WITHIN ReCBIR:   The research interests fall within following ReCBIR research lines:  

2. NEURAL AND COGNITIVE MECHANISMS OF FUNCTIONAL RECOVERY AND REHABILITATION UPON BRAIN INJURY

 

4. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF ACUTE AND EARLY-POSTACUTE INTERVENTIONS PROMOTING SUBSEQUENT REHABILITATION

5. SHORT- AND LONG-TERM BEHAVIOURAL AND COGNITIVE SYMPTOMS OF BRAIN INJURY
 
6. DEVELOPMENT OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL REHABILITATION METHODS
7. SHORT- AND LONG-TERM OUTCOME OF POSTTRAUMATIC NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL REHABILITATION
                   
  POTENTIAL EDUCATIONAL COLLABORATION  

The unit can contribute to the educational programmes of ReCBIR at the levels:

2. PH.D. LEVEL

3. POSTDOCTORIAL LEVEL

The unit can accept one student at any one time for up to three months for the cognitive rehabilitation programme (2, 4 & 6) and another student for the same period to participate in the work with patients who are in coma, vegetative, or minimally conscious (4, 5 &7). The unit is also prepared to give lectures and workshops.

 
 
 
BACK TO TOP        
         
  Examples of publications

 

     
 

Wilson, B.A. (1997) Cognitive rehabilitation: How it is and how it might be, Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 3, 487-496.

Wilson, B.A. (1999) Case studies in neuropsychological rehabilitation, New York, Oxford University Press.

Wilson, B.A. (2002) Towards a comprehensive model of cognitive rehabilitation, Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 12, 97 - 110.

Wilson, B.A. (2003) Treatment and recovery from brain damage. In L. Nadel (Ed) Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science, Vol. 1. London: Nature Publishing Group.

Wilson, B.A., Clare, L., Young, A. & Hodges, J. (1997) Knowing where and knowing what: A double dissociation, Cortex, 33, 529-541.

Wilson, B.A., Emslie, H.C., Quirk, K. & Evans, J.J. (2001) Reducing everyday memory and planning problems by means of a paging system: A randomised control crossover study, Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 70, 477-482.

 
BACK TO TOP        
                   
HOME ABOUT ReCBIR GOALS NETWORK PROJECTS EDUCATION PUBLICATIONS LINKS CONTACT